Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Serious Question for my Readers

Question for my Muslims readers: When you read this article (link), does your conscience tell you that this sort of behavior is wrong? If so, are you aware that this sort of activity is a natural consequence of zealously following the teachings of the Koran?

Question for my readers who follow Vatican 2's proclamation that "the plan of salvation includes" Muslims: Can you see from the example above that zealously following Islam leads to eternal destruction? If so, how do you justify to yourself your church's claim? Can you not admit that your church has erred on this point?

Question for my readers who are Evangelical: What steps are you taking to convert Muslims to Christianity? Muslims are an increasing fraction of society, and they desperately need the gospel, without which they will be lost.

These are mostly rhetorical questions. I'm not looking for debate in the comment box, just asking people to think seriously about eternal matters.

-Turretinfan

9 comments:

natamllc said...

I do think seriously about these matters.

I would to God I had as much courage as this martyr! She knew the risks.

Thanks for this saddening article. The really sad thing for me is I am reading it and commenting about it in the safety of my personal space without a sense of that spirit of murder she surely sensed after the Holy Ghost Graciously "opened" her heart and soul to the Glory of the Lord and the Kingdom of His Glory according to the Will of the Lord God Almighty!

This sort of topic, this article helps me become stronger and more obedient to Faith:

Rom 16:25 Now to him who is able to strengthen you according to my gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery that was kept secret for long ages
Rom 16:26 but has now been disclosed and through the prophetic writings has been made known to all nations, according to the command of the eternal God, to bring about the obedience of faith--
Rom 16:27 to the only wise God be glory forevermore through Jesus Christ! Amen.

Paul Hoffer said...

I read the article too. I will pray for the that poor girl's soul.

Such violence against Christians is not limited to Muslims. Here is an article where Hindus attacked and killed a nun:
http://catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=29041.

It is things like this that cause one to wonder if the Crusades were not such a bad idea after all.

Turretinfan said...

PH wrote: "I read the article too. I will pray for the that poor girl's soul."

That's not a good idea.

a) Whereever she was going, presumably heaven, she's already there.

b) Normally martyrs aren't thought of as having to go to Purgatory ... if you were more consistent with Catholicism, I'd expect to hear you praying to her soul.

c) But, of course, that's not a good idea either, because there is no reason to think she can hear you or could understand you even if she could hear you (I don't suppose you speak Arabic).

PH wrote: "Such violence against Christians is not limited to Muslims. Here is an article where Hindus attacked and killed a nun:
http://catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=29041."

Being a nun doesn't make one a Christian. Christianity is defined by faith in Christ alone for salvation. At the same time, I wouldn't be the least surprised to find out that she was killed because her attacker(s) thought her to be a Christian.

PH wrote: "It is things like this that cause one to wonder if the Crusades were not such a bad idea after all."

They served a purpose in God's providence.

-TurretinFan

Turretinfan said...

Paul, your other comment (the one that has not published yet) is worth addressing in a separate post, when I have the time.

-TurretinFan

Turretinfan said...

Same for Ben's as-yet-unpublished comment.

Paul Hoffer said...

So am I to understand from your comments then, that the murdered nun was disqualified from being matryr and saint of Christ due to her wearing a habit?

Would your opinion about the martyrdom and sanctification of about the young Saudi Arabian girl change if you were to learn that she were a Coptic Orthodox or Catholic Copt?

What criteria did you use to determine that the Arab girl had earned a martyr's crown while the nun had not? What method did you use to discern what was in their hearts?

These are not rhetorical questions BTW.

Turretinfan said...

PH wrote: "So am I to understand from your comments then, that the murdered nun was disqualified from being matryr and saint of Christ due to her wearing a habit?"

No. That's not what you are to understand.

What you are to understand is that I have a healthy skepticism of the monastic orders.

PH wrote: "Would your opinion about the martyrdom and sanctification of about the young Saudi Arabian girl change if you were to learn that she were a Coptic Orthodox or Catholic Copt?"

I don't have an opinion about the martyrdom or sanctification of the Arabian girl. I know that she evidently chose Christ over Islam, which suggests faith in Christ.

PH wrote: "What criteria did you use to determine that the Arab girl had earned a martyr's crown while the nun had not?"

a) I didn't say the nun did not. I simply pointed out that being a nun doesn't make one a Christian.

b) I'm more impressed by a girl who had to try to keep her religion secret from her family, and who - upon discovery - refused to recant (apparently under torture), than I am about someone who is murdered by strangers because of clothes that she was wearing (if, in fact, that is why the nun was murdered, which I don't know).

PH wrote: "What method did you use to discern what was in their hearts?"

The only way to discern hearts is by deeds. But, you've assumed to much in formulating your question.

Incidentally, since your unpublished comment seems to have been substantially reproduced in the post on your own blog, I'll let my most recent post (link) stand as my answer.

-TurretinFan

Rickson said...

IF you think being a nun doesn't make one christian, you really have to read, C.S Lewis' Mere Christianity. He really talks about people like you who he fears one day will make christianity so dilute that they will tell another, I am more "charitably" "generously" "sincerely" closer to christ than you are, so I am a christian. But Lewis says it is not so. You cannot dilute or use such adjectives (anyone who has faith in christ is a christian). this is in one sense. Not in the strict sense. Lewis says, there has to be certain common ground that makes one a christian. He says baptism is one. What then if a baptized christian does not love? is not chartitable? not generous? not sincere unlike one who is baptized? Isn't the unbaptized more christian than the former? No. Lewis says if the former does not love, it makes him a bad christian but he does not cease to be a christian. You don't even have to read the whole of mere christianity. the explanation is in the preface.

Turretinfan said...

I've read C.S. Lewis. I am not impressed by his theological writings, though his fiction works are quite entertaining.

My rule of faith is Scriptures. The Scriptures teach us who the disciples of Christ (i.e. Christians) are, and they are not simply those who have received the outward sign of the new covenant (baptism).

Instead, they are those who do the will of the Father.

-Turretinfan