Sunday, April 06, 2008

Comparing the Mass to Animal Sacrifices

Reginald, who had been providing some interaction on 2 Thessalonians 2:15 appears to have lost interest in that discussion because he didn't like this comment I made in passing in another (completely unrelated) discussion:

As to (1), the application to transubstantiation is too easy. So, I'll leave it at that.

Reginald doesn't really explain why he doesn't like the comment. Perhaps he sees something unspoken behind the comment. Perhaps he simply doesn't understand the comment. It really has nothing to do with the 2 Thessalonians 2:15 discussion, and in fact it was made in response to this comment by one of my other readers:

1. A Santiera priest was told by the courts that he could not offer his animal sacrifices in the Dallas/Ft. Worth city/county lines per the city's ordinance.

The context was religious persecution that I had described in this earlier post (link).

Now, I don't mind if Reginald wants to take offense at my comment or use that as a reason not to interact on the unrelated topic of 2 Thessalonians 2:15.

I just think its worth spelling out the argument:

1. Greater Dallas has decided that animal sacrifices cannot be made within its city limits.
2. These days, biologists classify man as an animal.
3. In the mass, it is claimed by Roman Catholics (including Reginald) that the substance of the bread and wine is changed into the substance of the body and blood of Christ.
4. Furthermore, calling the mass a sacrifice is perfectly orthodox Catholic theology: "So priests must instruct their people to offer to God the Father the Divine Victim in the Sacrifice of the Mass" (emphasis original - link to original) - even in the ecumenicism of post-V2:
"There can never be any repetition of that act; it happened once and for all (Hebrews 10:10). Nevertheless, the Eucharist truly has a sacrificial character because Christ is really present there in the very act of his supreme self-gift to his Father. The sacramental presence of Christ himself is at once the sacramental presence of his sacrifice also, because the Christ who is present is he who has entered the sanctuary once and for all bearing his own blood to secure an eternal redemption (Hebrews 9:12).[109] He now lives forever, exercising a perpetual priesthood, making intercession for us (Hebrews 7:24-25). Catholics regret any impression they may have given of a repetition of Christ’s sacrifice in the Mass, but they also reject the overreaction which denies a sacrificial character to the Eucharist." (source)

In view of those four essentially indisputable facts, it seems as though if Muslims took over the Greater Dallas machine they could use the same prohibition on animal sacrifices against the Mass, and forbid Catholics from conducting the Mass within the city limits.

(Update: I came across this Muslim comment to a Catholic today, which tends to confirm that they would see things that way: "Since Muslims are forbidden to partake in cannibalism, I shall leave the "body and blood" bit to you who are allowed to indulge in such practices. I do not follow the example of John Paul, that is for YOU as Catholic to do {referring to JP2 kissing the Koran}. I follow the example of Jesus [peace and blessings of Allah be upon him] and I call on the one true God, HIS own God [John 20:17; Rev. 3:12], who is not he himself. I thought you would do likewise." (braces added - square brackets in original)

Reginald considers this vinegar, but he doesn't explain why. While I don't mind people taking offense at what I write (thanks Carrie!), I'd not want to give Reginald or anyone else needless offense.

I'd love to hear his explanation.


P.S. Updated to correct a typo caught by Carrie.


Carrie said...

at what I right

"right" should equal "write".

Also, did you mean to place a link to the Muslim comment?

Turretinfan said...

No - the Muslim comment was in an unlink-able forum.

Thanks for the typo correction!


Carrie said...

No - the Muslim comment was in an unlink-able forum.

That wasn't a correction, I was just interested in the thread.

Hey, you don't have to publish my typo corrections. And I hope you don't mind, but your posts are always very polished so when I come cross a mistake I feel the need to bring it to your attention for some reason. :)

Turretinfan said...

Thanks for the comments! The posts are far from as polished as I'd like. I remember once to my chagrin I discovered I'd mispelled the Tertullian's name wrong about a dozen times in a single post!